Mr. Dropout’s Manhattan Walkabout — ANIMAL

comments | 4 years ago | 7 notes 

Country in the City: New York Magazine On Rosanne Cash

92y:

It doesn’t fit the Johnny Cash legend, but he spent significant time in an apartment he owned at 40 Central Park South and stayed regularly at the Sherry-Netherland, the Plaza, and the Plaza Athénée.

“Those were some of the best memories of my adolescence,” she tells me over tea in her townhouse. “I saw Applause with Lauren Bacall and The Magic Show with Doug Henning. There were still Automats, and Rumpelmayer’s was a big deal, and the Trader Vic’s in the basement of the Plaza. My dad was not terribly strict, and he would treat you like an adult. And he exuded this love for the city.”

Country in the City [New York Magazine]

Ms. Cash will be at the 92nd Street Y on October 7 for a conversation about her life in music, and her new memoir Composed, with author A.M. Holmes.

comments | 4 years ago | 3 notes 

hyperallergic:

The BP station across the street from Exit Art reflects onto the window showcasing the Bruce High Quality Foundation’s 2007 installation “Beyond Pastoral (Shroud of Turin).”
The Bruce High Quality Foundation’s 2007 piece presented a multifaceted consideration of our energy crisis, going beyond just condemning BP. Using 7,000 lemons and limes in the design of the starburst BP logo, they powered the illumination of a 1/5 scale model of a BP station. Furthermore, the BHQF made transparent the limitations of their alternate energy provider: in their statement, they recognize the 111 gallons of gasoline required to ship the fruit to and from the gallery (to their eventual resting place in a free composting program). Additionally, the lemons and limes began to rot and posed a health risk, turning the colorful pattern into a non-functioning brown. Ultimately, the piece called for more complex and sustainable solutions to our energy concerns that are ever apparent today.

hyperallergic:

The BP station across the street from Exit Art reflects onto the window showcasing the Bruce High Quality Foundation’s 2007 installation “Beyond Pastoral (Shroud of Turin).”

The Bruce High Quality Foundation’s 2007 piece presented a multifaceted consideration of our energy crisis, going beyond just condemning BP. Using 7,000 lemons and limes in the design of the starburst BP logo, they powered the illumination of a 1/5 scale model of a BP station. Furthermore, the BHQF made transparent the limitations of their alternate energy provider: in their statement, they recognize the 111 gallons of gasoline required to ship the fruit to and from the gallery (to their eventual resting place in a free composting program). Additionally, the lemons and limes began to rot and posed a health risk, turning the colorful pattern into a non-functioning brown. Ultimately, the piece called for more complex and sustainable solutions to our energy concerns that are ever apparent today.

comments | 4 years ago | 3 notes 

“The New York Times is getting ready to join The New Yorker, Life, Blackbook and, most prominently, Newsweek by adding a Tumblr to the list of ways it publishes content. Or republishes content. Or comments on its content.”

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“We try coordinating so my creaks and her farts occur as one singular sound. It often helps mask each other’s releases. 10 minutes ago via web”

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comments | 4 years ago | 0 notes 

‘Killers Join the Dalai Lama’ — ANIMAL

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“If I have a choice between math and almost anything else, I choose math.”

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The New York City Munchie Guide : Map : Gridskipper
For 4/20 foodies…

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“In the trial at the Daniel Patrick Moynihan U.S. Courthouse in Lower Manhattan, federal prosecutors alleged that former Duane Reade executives Anthony Cuti, who was CEO, and William Tennant, who was CFO, conspired to exaggerate earnings to boost stock value, which in turn would increase the value of their own shares in the company. To do this, prosecutors said the executives used sham real estate transactions between 2000 and 2005 to pad the bottom line in public filings. They are both charged with multiple counts including securities fraud.”

comments | 4 years ago | 1 note